August 21, 2019

When does trash talking work?

Boxers Floyd Mayweather Jr. and Conor McGregor engage in some verbal sparring prior to their 2017 bout. AP Photo/John Locher The Abstract features interesting research and...
August 21, 2019

When does trash talking work?

Boxers Floyd Mayweather Jr. and Conor McGregor engage in some verbal sparring prior to their 2017 bout. AP Photo/John Locher The Abstract features interesting research and...
August 20, 2019

Veteran walks from Washington state to Disney World to raise awareness for suicide among service members

They say it’s not the destination, it’s the journey.
August 20, 2019

America’s first restaurant to serve legal marijuana to open in California

A restaurant in California will be offering marijuana to customers as part of their regular menu.
August 20, 2019

The misguided attacks on ‘This Land Is Your Land’

Some of Guthrie's greatest champions have had difficulties with the song. Al Aumuller/Library of Congress

In recent years, Woody Guthrie’s “This Land Is Your Land” has become a rallying cry for immigrants. And in July, after President Donald Trump tweeted that four Democratic congresswomen of color needed to “go back where they came from,” Congresswoman Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, one of the four targeted, responded with a tweet quoting Guthrie’s lyrics.

But not everyone sees the song as an anthem for inclusion.

In June, the Smithsonian’s online magazine, Folklife, published a piece that lambasted the song for its omissions.

The article, titled “This Land Is Whose Land?,” was written by folk musician Mali Obomsawin, a member of the Native American Abenaki tribe. She wrote of being shaken up “like a soda can” every time she heard the song’s lyrics:

“In the context of America, a nation-state built by settler colonialism, Woody Guthrie’s protest anthem exemplifies the particular blind spot that Americans have in regard to Natives: American patriotism erases us, even if it comes in the form of a leftist protest song. Why? Because this land ‘was’ our land. Through genocide, broken treaties and a legal system created by and for the colonial interest, this land ‘became’ American land.”

Obomsawin’s article immediately generated a flurry of responses from conservative media outlets.

Commie Folksinger Woody Guthrie Not Woke Enough for Mob,” jeered Breitbart’s John Nolte, delighted with this evidence of internecine strife among what he dubbed the “fascist woketards” of the American left. The Daily Wire’s Emily Zanotti soon joined the fray, penning a piece under the headline “This Land Is NOT Your Land: Woke Culture Now Demanding Woody Guthrie Be Canceled Over Folk Music Faux Pas.”

But Obomsawin and her conservative critics might be surprised to learn that some of Guthrie’s greatest champions have also had difficulties with the song.

As the author of three books on Guthrie, I sometimes wonder how the folksinger would respond to the criticism of “This Land Is Your Land” for its omissions.

While we can’t know for sure, a glance at some of his unpublished writings and recently discovered recordings can offer some clues.

Seeger sings a different tune

Pete Seeger, Woody’s colleague and protégé, was perhaps the most responsible for lodging “This Land Is Your Land” in the public consciousness. After Guthrie died in 1967, Seeger continued to perform the song all around the world.

At the same time, Seeger made it clear that he was sensitive to the theft of Native American lands.

In his memoir, “Where Have All the Flowers Gone,” Seeger recalled an incident during a 1968 performance:

“Jimmy Collier, a great young black singer from the Midwest, was asked to lead [‘This Land Is Your Land.’] Henry Crowdog [sic] of the Sioux Indian delegation came up and punched his finger in Jimmy’s chest. ‘Hey, you’re both wrong. It belongs to me.’ Jimmy stopped and added seriously, ‘Should we not sing this song?’ Then a big grin came over Henry Crowdog’s face. 'No, it’s okay. Go ahead and sing it. As long as we are all down here together to get something done.’”

When performing, Pete Seeger occasionally tweaked the lyrics to ‘This Land Is Your Land.’ Josef SCHWARZ/Wikimedia Commons, CC BY-SA

Sometimes, in an attempt to ease his conscience when performing “This Land,” Seeger would add a verse penned by the singer and activist Carolyn “Cappy” Israel to acknowledge the theft of Native land:

    This land is your land, but it once was my land
    Before we sold you Manhattan Island
    You pushed my nation to the reservation,
    This land was stole by you from me.

Woody wasn’t oblivious

Was Guthrie himself uncomfortable with the song’s glaring failure to acknowledge the facts of settler colonialism?

There’s no record of his views on the issue. But we do know that he was very aware of – and concerned with – the history of Native American dispossession.

For example, he was angry enough with his cousin, the country singer “Oklahoma Jack” Guthrie, for claiming credit for a song that Woody had written, titled “Oklahoma Hills.” But as Woody wrote in an unpublished annotation to the lyrics, Jack had also left out “the best parts of the whole song” – the names of “the Chickasaw, Choctaw, Cherokee, Creek and Seminole” who had prior claim to the lands of Oklahoma.

Then there’s a soundbite in a posthumously discovered live recording from 1949:

“They used dope, they used opium, they used every kind of a trick to get these Indians to sign over their lands,” Guthrie says to the crowd.

One of these real estate tricksters was actually Woody’s own father, Charley Guthrie. As biographer and journalist Joe Klein writes in “Woody Guthrie: A Life,” “Because he was able to speak both Creek and Cherokee, Charley became known as especially adept at relieving Indians of their property.”

How did Charley learn these Native tongues? Was it possible that the Guthries had Native ancestors?

In a tantalizingly vague 1950 letter to activist Stetson Kennedy, Woody notes “the rainbow blends” of his own bloodline, including “pure virgin island negro” and unnamed “Indian tribelines.”

And in an unpublished poem entitled “Sweety Black Girl,” written the same year, Guthrie writes:

    my 
    blood beats Spanish and my breath burns Indian and my
    soul boils negro. 

Guthrie admitted that he was ashamed of his father’s disreputable real estate practices. And while he may have idealized his own genealogy, there’s no doubt that he was fully aware of “whose land was whose.”

Native Americans see Guthrie as an ally

Interestingly, not all Native Americans view the song in the same light as Obomsawin.

The song has proved adaptable and malleable enough to enable some Native American artists to work with it.

In 2007, the Anishinaabe songwriter and musician Keith Secola sang his Ojibwa-language version of “This Land” on the album “Native Americana — A Coup Stick.”

Secola said in an interview that his version “reflects a worldview, of being a part of the world and not detached from it. Woody was into people creating their own stories. … That’s what I got from him – how to apply this strategy, this procedure of songwriting, to the topics that affect American Indians.”

A few years before Secola’s cover, two of Guthrie’s previously unpublished songs – “Indian Corn Song” and “Mean Things Happenin’ in This World” – were recorded by the Navajo siblings, Klee, Clayson and Jeneda Benally.

“We wanted to keep the spirit of Woody Guthrie alive,” Clayton said in a 2012 interview. “He wrote songs about the Dust Bowl and unions, but he also wrote about American Indian issues.”

Clayson noted that “Indian Corn Song” was one of his favorite songs to play, because in it Guthrie “talks about wastefulness and how Indigenous people are … living off the planet in a balanced way.”

Mali Obomsawin might take heart from Secola, the Benally siblings and the other artist-activists who have adopted and adapted “This Land Is Your Land.”

Woody Guthrie might not have been perfect, they say, but we don’t need to “cancel” him.

We’ll work with him instead.


“Sweety Black Girl” and unpublished Woody Guthrie correspondence and annotations, words by Woody Guthrie © Copyright Woody Guthrie Publications, Inc., all rights reserved, used by permission.

[ Like what you’ve read? Want more? Sign up for The Conversation’s daily newsletter. ]

The Conversation

Will Kaufman has received funding from the Arts and Humanities Research Council and the Broadcast Music Industry (BMI) Foundation.

August 20, 2019

The misguided attacks on ‘This Land Is Your Land’

Some of Guthrie's greatest champions have had difficulties with the song. Al Aumuller/Library of Congress

In recent years, Woody Guthrie’s “This Land Is Your Land” has become a rallying cry for immigrants. And in July, after President Donald Trump tweeted that four Democratic congresswomen of color needed to “go back where they came from,” Congresswoman Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, one of the four targeted, responded with a tweet quoting Guthrie’s lyrics.

But not everyone sees the song as an anthem for inclusion.

In June, the Smithsonian’s online magazine, Folkways, published a piece that lambasted the song for its omissions.

The article, titled “This Land Is Whose Land?,” was written by folk musician Mali Obomsawin, a member of the Native American Abenaki tribe. She wrote of being shaken up “like a soda can” every time she heard the song’s lyrics:

“In the context of America, a nation-state built by settler colonialism, Woody Guthrie’s protest anthem exemplifies the particular blind spot that Americans have in regard to Natives: American patriotism erases us, even if it comes in the form of a leftist protest song. Why? Because this land ‘was’ our land. Through genocide, broken treaties and a legal system created by and for the colonial interest, this land ‘became’ American land.”

Obomsawin’s article immediately generated a flurry of responses from conservative media outlets.

Commie Folksinger Woody Guthrie Not Woke Enough for Mob,” jeered Breitbart’s John Nolte, delighted with this evidence of internecine strife among what he dubbed the “fascist woketards” of the American left. The Daily Wire’s Emily Zanotti soon joined the fray, penning a piece under the headline “This Land Is NOT Your Land: Woke Culture Now Demanding Woody Guthrie Be Canceled Over Folk Music Faux Pas.”

But Obomsawin and her conservative critics might be surprised to learn that some of Guthrie’s greatest champions have also had difficulties with the song.

As the author of three books on Guthrie, I sometimes wonder how the folksinger would respond to the criticism of “This Land Is Your Land” for its omissions.

While we can’t know for sure, a glance at some of his unpublished writings and recently discovered recordings can offer some clues.

Seeger sings a different tune

Pete Seeger, Woody’s colleague and protégé, was perhaps the most responsible for lodging “This Land Is Your Land” in the public consciousness. After Guthrie died in 1967, Seeger continued to perform the song all around the world.

At the same time, Seeger made it clear that he was sensitive to the theft of Native American lands.

In his memoir, “Where Have All the Flowers Gone,” Seeger recalled an incident during a 1968 performance:

“Jimmy Collier, a great young black singer from the Midwest, was asked to lead [‘This Land Is Your Land.’] Henry Crowdog [sic] of the Sioux Indian delegation came up and punched his finger in Jimmy’s chest. ‘Hey, you’re both wrong. It belongs to me.’ Jimmy stopped and added seriously, ‘Should we not sing this song?’ Then a big grin came over Henry Crowdog’s face. 'No, it’s okay. Go ahead and sing it. As long as we are all down here together to get something done.’”

When performing, Pete Seeger occasionally tweaked the lyrics to ‘This Land Is Your Land.’ Josef SCHWARZ/Wikimedia Commons, CC BY-SA

Sometimes, in an attempt to ease his conscience when performing “This Land,” Seeger would add a verse penned by the singer and activist Carolyn “Cappy” Israel to acknowledge the theft of Native land:

    This land is your land, but it once was my land
    Before we sold you Manhattan Island
    You pushed my nation to the reservation,
    This land was stole by you from me.

Woody wasn’t oblivious

Was Guthrie himself uncomfortable with the song’s glaring failure to acknowledge the facts of settler colonialism?

There’s no record of his views on the issue. But we do know that he was very aware of – and concerned with – the history of Native American dispossession.

For example, he was angry enough with his cousin, the country singer “Oklahoma Jack” Guthrie, for claiming credit for a song that Woody had written, titled “Oklahoma Hills.” But as Woody wrote in an unpublished annotation to the lyrics, Jack had also left out “the best parts of the whole song” – the names of “the Chickasaw, Choctaw, Cherokee, Creek and Seminole” who had prior claim to the lands of Oklahoma.

Then there’s a soundbite in a posthumously discovered live recording from 1949:

“They used dope, they used opium, they used every kind of a trick to get these Indians to sign over their lands,” Guthrie says to the crowd.

One of these real estate tricksters was actually Woody’s own father, Charley Guthrie. As biographer and journalist Joe Klein writes in “Woody Guthrie: A Life,” “Because he was able to speak both Creek and Cherokee, Charley became known as especially adept at relieving Indians of their property.”

How did Charley learn these Native tongues? Was it possible that the Guthries had Native ancestors?

In a tantalizingly vague 1950 letter to activist Stetson Kennedy, Woody notes “the rainbow blends” of his own bloodline, including “pure virgin island negro” and unnamed “Indian tribelines.”

And in an unpublished poem entitled “Sweety Black Girl,” written the same year, Guthrie writes:

    my 
    blood beats Spanish and my breath burns Indian and my
    soul boils negro. 

Guthrie admitted that he was ashamed of his father’s disreputable real estate practices. And while he may have idealized his own genealogy, there’s no doubt that he was fully aware of “whose land was whose.”

Native Americans see Guthrie as an ally

Interestingly, not all Native Americans view the song in the same light as Obomsawin.

The song has proved adaptable and malleable enough to enable some Native American artists to work with it.

In 2007, the Anishinaabe songwriter and musician Keith Secola sang his Ojibwa-language version of “This Land” on the album “Native Americana — A Coup Stick.”

Secola said in an interview that his version “reflects a worldview, of being a part of the world and not detached from it. Woody was into people creating their own stories. … That’s what I got from him – how to apply this strategy, this procedure of songwriting, to the topics that affect American Indians.”

A few years before Secola’s cover, two of Guthrie’s previously unpublished songs – “Indian Corn Song” and “Mean Things Happenin’ in This World” – were recorded by the Navajo siblings, Klee, Clayson and Jeneda Benally.

“We wanted to keep the spirit of Woody Guthrie alive,” Clayton said in a 2012 interview. “He wrote songs about the Dust Bowl and unions, but he also wrote about American Indian issues.”

Clayson noted that “Indian Corn Song” was one of his favorite songs to play, because in it Guthrie “talks about wastefulness and how Indigenous people are … living off the planet in a balanced way.”

Mali Obomsawin might take heart from Secola, the Benally siblings and the other artist-activists who have adopted and adapted “This Land Is Your Land.”

Woody Guthrie might not have been perfect, they say, but we don’t need to “cancel” him.

We’ll work with him instead.


“Sweety Black Girl” and unpublished Woody Guthrie correspondence and annotations, words by Woody Guthrie © Copyright Woody Guthrie Publications, Inc., all rights reserved, used by permission.

[ Like what you’ve read? Want more? Sign up for The Conversation’s daily newsletter. ]

The Conversation

Will Kaufman has received funding from the Arts and Humanities Research Council and the Broadcast Music Industry (BMI) Foundation.

August 20, 2019

Bachelor In Paradise Season 6, Episode 5 Recap: You Spin Me Right ’Round

The last episode of ABC's Bachelor in Paradise left us literally in the middle of a physical fight. A physical fight that started because of a piñata. Jordan Kimball decided to knock down the piñata Christian Estrada had set up for Nicole Lopez-Alvar, which then led to them pushing each other back and forth...

And this is where August 19's episode begins. After the pushing escalates, Jordan throws Christian off of one of those daybed platform things and they continue trying to fight each other on the beach. At this point, security rushes in to pull them off each other. Jordan moves away from the situation with no problem, but Christian breaks free and tries to run back to Jordan. Twice. Of course, the, like, eight security guards catch him easily. Christian also takes off his shirt while security is walking him away, because men.

The show handles things very swiftly after this, both from a production standpoint and the edit of the aftermath we see on the show, and it's very well done. A producer and Chris Harrison sit down with Jordan and Christian separately and tell them that there is a zero tolerance policy for physical altercations, so they both have to go. (Thank goodness. If you ask me, there was no one to root for here.) Chris Harrison lets the cast know the duo are leaving, and they give some commentary that makes it sound like they're fighting in a war. "We had to send two men home," Nicole says, dramatically. Well, they served their time.

Speaking of Nicole, with Christian out of the picture, she finds comfort in Clay Harbor once again. She wanted a man who would be more aggressive in pursuing her, she says of the fight, "but not like this." Nicole and Clay kiss on a daybed next to what appears to be an unacknowledged plate of petit fours. All is well.

Also with Jordan and Christian gone, now only two men are set to leave at the rose ceremony. The rose that is most up in the air is Hannah Godwin's, which is either going to Dylan Barbour or to Blake Horstmann. Dylan tries to woo Hannah with a cheese plate and a bowl of gummy worms. Blake tries to woo her by saying, "Tonight I want to remind you why you have a little bit of a crush on me" and... brings out a mariachi band. They dance, which is Blake's ~move~. Blake and Hannah start making out, right where Dylan can see them. "Everyone’s like, 'Don't watch,'" says Dylan. "I'm like, 'I need to see it.'" He cries.

Before the rose ceremony begins, Onyeka Ehie announces that she'll be leaving. As she says in her confessional, "I just feel like I've been passed by by every person here ... The same girls are going on the same dates." That really sucks. It also sucks that this is hard for her to the point where she feels she can't just chill on the beach and drink margaritas with Wells Adams. You can tell the pressure really got to her.

With this revelation, now three guys are going home. The couples go as follows: Demi Burnett and Derek Peth, Katie Morton and Chris Bukowski, Nicole and Clay, Caelynn Miller-Keyes and Dean Unglert, Tayshia Adams and John Paul Jones, Sydney Lotuaco and Mike Johnson, Hannah and Dylan, and Kristina Schulman and Blake. What.

First of all, with Hannah and Dylan, it's immediately like he wasn't crying over watching her make out with Blake 30 minutes ago. Everyone is happy about her decision.

Second of all, the cast is shook about Kristina and Blake. Why would she choose Blake? Does she really think he deserves a second chance at love like she says?

Well, after the ceremony she goes up to Blake and says, "Welcome to your personal hell, because you're going to be here to watch [Dylan and Hannah]." Wow. This is like when she asked Blake on a date and told the camera, "I'm going to make him my bitch."

Like, it's actually like that, because neither situation ends up being as dramatic as it seems. Kristina clarified on Twitter that she thought Blake should stay and just likes giving him shit. Oh, well. Kristina is doing what she can to make this show interesting. I'll take it.

By the way, Wills Reid, Kevin Fortenberry, and AlwaysBeCam are the ones to leave. Cam says "Always Be Crying" as he makes his exit.

The next day, a new lady enters Paradise. She's Caitlin Clemmens from Colton Underwood's season and she has a date card. Because he's the most single of them all, she asks Blake to go. In what has to be the greatest moment of the night, Blake reveals that he met Caitlin at Stagecoach too! Are you k-id-ing me? He says they didn't hook up, but damn! Please, bring out more contestants who were at Stagecoach. Never let this end.

Caitlin and Blake go to do tantric yoga (you know, for extra closeness) and he fills her in on everything that's happened with him so far in Paradise. It's a lot in the amount of stuff that's gone down and a lot for a person to take in. Caitlin is basically like, okay, whatever, dude, I just got here so let's go make out in the pool.

In his confessional, Blake says of the drama he had with four women that was directly caused by his own actions, "I'm ready to forgive myself." Blake feels he's been hard on himself, and I actually agree. He's been hard on himself by making himself one of the victims in this, when that wasn't necessary and he could have just moved on. The women said their piece about him and that was that. All he had to do was the same thing, but — and I'm taking things back into the real world for a minute — he didn't.

Moving away from that mess, Dylan gets a date card and takes Hannah and finally gets to have some alone time with her that isn't full of tears and the threat of Hannah and Blake breaking into dance. He confesses that he's falling in love with her and she says she's "all in." It's really pretty cute, and I guess I ship them now?

Photo: Courtesy of ABC.

Back at the beach, Katie and Chris are being all flirty and cute. He thinks his sixth Bachelor show might really be the charm. And Tayshia and John Paul Jones are also all flirty and cute. He can't believe a woman as beautiful as her is giving him the time of day, and even says he's starting to fall in love with her. She calls their connection "bizarre," but she's into it. Meanwhile, I haven't forgotten how in the trailer for the full Bachelor In Paradise season he's shown rubbing sunscreen all over Haley "Twin" Ferguson's butt! What's that about, John Paul Jones?

The final act of this episode is all about Demi. Former Bachelorette Hannah Brown arrives to talk to her friend, and, one would think, bring some news about the woman Demi's been seeing back home and who we already know is going to appear on the show. But instead, Hannah and Demi just talk about how things are going. Basically, Demi still has feelings for the woman she's dating, but also really likes Derek.

Then, she goes to talk to Derek, and, one would think, share some news with him about how she feels. But instead, it's just the same thing she's been saying all along about liking him and liking the woman. And as he has been all along, Derek is chill and says he just wants to spend whatever time with her he can.

The cast is all wondering what's happening. Why is Hannah Brown there? What did she tell Demi? What did Demi tell Derek? And the answer is... nothing.

At least not yet. The episode ends with a producer saying, "Demi would like to see Chris Harrison." Presumably, this will be her asking for the woman, who she names as "Kristian," to come down to Paradise, but, man, are they dragging this out. At least Hannah B. seems to have gotten a post-Jed Wyatt trip to Mexico out of this. I hope she spent the rest of the time chilling on a beach with a frozen drink. Just not this beach.

Losers of the Night: Christian, Jordan, Blake

Winners of the Night: Dylan, Hannah B, Stagecoach

Like what you see? How about some more R29 goodness, right here?

What Is Going On Between Kristina & Blake In The Bachelor In Paradise Episode 6 Promo?

Everyone Who's Confirmed For 2019's Bachelor In Paradise Cast

How Long Does Blake Stay On Bachelor In Paradise?

August 20, 2019

What Is Going On Between Kristina & Blake In The Bachelor In Paradise Episode 6 Promo?

On Aug. 19, the latest Bachelor in Paradise promo questioned, "Is Kristina still in love with Blake?" and it also featured a confrontation between Kristina Schulman and Caitlin Clemmens, who was Blake Horstmann's most recent date. "What I do and my actions are none of your business," Kristina snapped at Caitlin in the promo. Based on Kristina's actions post-show, it seems there may be some feelings there, but they may also be strictly platonic. (At least on her end.)

It isn't a huge stretch to think that they would be able to carry on a friendship after the show ended. Kristina did save Blake with her rose on Monday night. It seemed she did that partially because she wanted him to get another chance to find love and partially to get back at him. To his face, she said, "I know you have not had an ideal time here in Paradise." She added that she thought he was a good person who deserved to find love. Later, she said in a confessional that she also wanted him to stick around to see Dylan Barbour and Hannah Godwin dating. "It's kind of mean, but it's Blake we’re talking about. The temptation's too good," she said.

Between that rose and the date card, Kristina has given Blake a lot of chances at her own expense. She could have used that date or that rose to begin a new connection. So, perhaps her choosing to give them to Blake wasn't purely to get back at him — it may be because she also still had some level of feelings there — even if they were friendship feelings.

After BiP, Kristina has been open about being on better terms with Blake. Sure, he may have dated her, slept with her at Stagecoach, slept with Caelynn Miller-Keyes right after, and then pursued Tayshia Adams, Hannah G., and Caitlin in Paradise — but that was a long time ago, according to Kristina. An Instagram commenter posted on one of Kristina's posts recently saying that she was disappointed that Kristina seemed to be standing up for Blake post-show. Kristina responded, "You do realize the show airing now was filmed a month and a half ago — times doesn't stay still, things have happened since then."

Kristina also seemed to take Blake's side after he posted his private text messages with Caelynn on Instagram. "Speak your truth, no one can take that away from you," Kristina commented on his Instagram post about the situation. For his part, Blake has "liked" several of Kristina's post-show Instagram pics (a couple of which feature Kristina in a bikini), but he's been mostly laying low on the social media site since the whole text message release drama.

Kristina has not been laying low. She also took to Twitter after Monday's rose ceremony to further explain why she gave Blake her rose. "I have a big heart what can I say. EVERYONE DESERVES LOVE," she wrote, adding, "Ultimately, I care about people. Blake and I have been friends for the past year, yes I give him shit and he's very well aware but he came on the show to find love & I believed he deserved to stay."

I have a big heart what can I say. EVERYONE DESERVES LOVE #bachelorinparadise

— Kristina Schulman (@kristinaschulma) August 20, 2019

Ultimately, I care about people. Blake and I have been friends for the past year, yes I give him shit and he’s very well aware but he came on the show to find love & I believed he deserved to stay #bacheloreinparadise https://t.co/XRuWCrCvQm

— Kristina Schulman (@kristinaschulma) August 20, 2019

In Kristina's own words, it seems like she views Blake as a friend. She kept him on the show so he could continue to find love — not necessarily so he could find that love with her. Maybe she changed her mind later on the show and did see him romantically — but, at the very least, she seems to have his back both on the show and off, no matter what went drama went down between them.

Like what you see? How about some more R29 goodness, right here?

Bachelor In Paradise Season 6, Episode 5 Recap: You Spin Me Right ’Round

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August 19, 2019

Hiker who vanished in Northern California is found dead

The body of a hiker who vanished in Northern California last week was discovered Sunday and it is believed the cause of death stemmed from a slip on the rocky terrain in the Trinity Alps, a report said.
August 19, 2019

Jake & Tess Finally Hooked Up In Sweetbitter — Ella Purnell Answers All Your Finale Questions

Warning: Spoilers ahead for Sweetbitter season 2 finale “Bodega Cat.” “I think that you should fire Simone.” Those are the explosive last words of Sweetbitter season 2. One may expect someone as cutthroat as Sasha (Daniyar) to spit out that recommendat...