February 16, 2019

Mandy Moore Really Won’t Be Stopped — She Is Releasing New Music After Ryan Adams Allegations Break

Nothing can stop Mandy Moore from making new music. Not even the allegations of abuse against her ex-husband, Ryan Adams.

The singer-songwriter and This Is Us star excitedly told People that once the drama series goes on hiatus, she will get right to recording. She also shared that she’ll be collaborating with her husband, Taylor Goldsmith, the frontman of the folk rock band Dawes.

“We have things written, ready to go,” Moore said.

Long before she became Rebecca Pearson on This Is Us, Moore rose to fame as a singer. It has been about nine years since her last studio album, Amanda Leigh, was released. Moore’s character does occasionally sing on the show, a feat which she told Glamour in 2017 “lit a fire” within her.

“Music is a constant theme in my life. It has been for the past eight years,” she told the magazine. “I’ve just gotta navigate my way back to it.” Now, it looks like Moore has done just that.

Her announcement that new music is on the way comes on the heels of a New York Times report in which she claimed Adams was psychologically abusive during their relationship in ways that derailed her music career. Moore and Adams were married from 2009-2016.

“His controlling behavior essentially did block my ability to make new connections in the industry during a very pivotal and potentially lucrative time — my entire mid-to-late 20s,” Moore said.

Later Moore took to Instagram to commend “women who have suffered any sort of trauma or abuse.”

“Speaking your truth can be painful and triggering,” she wrote, “but it’s always worth it.”

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February 16, 2019

The Ridicule & Vilification Of Lorena Bobbitt Is Unmistakable In These 1993 Headlines

Every major news story has its subtext, and the Lorena Bobbitt case was no different. On June 23, 1993, Bobbitt (who now goes by her maiden name, Gallo) took a kitchen knife to her husband John Wayne Bobbitt’s penis, setting off a media maelstrom that touched on everything from gender inequality to domestic violence to immigration to medical miracles (police found Bobbitt’s severed organ and it was successfully reattached following a nine-hour procedure). The press had a field day with the incident and subsequent trial, which pitted Gallo against Bobbitt in a he-said, she-said trial for the ages. And the headlines about Lorena Bobbitt in 1993 were far from kind, understanding, or sensitive.

John Bobbitt, a former Marine, was initially portrayed as the victim, a husband who was unwittingly on the receiving end of his wife’s violent vitriol late one night. His all-American good looks and feigned innocence, however, eventually gave way to inconsistent testimony and a slew of witnesses who claimed that he had beaten Gallo and abused her emotionally throughout the course of their marriage. Headlines turned from “Man Denies Rape Of Wife Before She Mutilated Him ” to “Wife Tells Jury of Love Story, Then ‘Torture,’” accordingly.

Gallo, meanwhile, was portrayed simultaneously as a naive, broken woman who was battered by her then-husband, pushed to her breaking point, and as a jealous, vindictive wife who was angry about the couple’s impending divorce. Particularly cruel headlines called her a “HOT BLOODED LATINA” and a “jealous wife” who lashed out when she realized her American dream had been shattered. (Gallo was born in Ecuador in 1969, raised in Venezuela, and came to the United States in 1987 on a student visa).

Perhaps what was most telling of the times, and what continues to be a point of discussion about the case today, is that most of the headlines sensationalized the actual act of cutting off the penis—but not the alleged abuse and violence that likely caused it. Headlines like “I Felt a Tug” and “It Hurt Real Bad” pointed the media’s lens toward the almost Shakespearean tragicomedy unfolding in newspapers and on TV, playing on the public’s intrigue in the grotesque nature of the crime itself. Other headlines punched up the inevitable penis puns: “She wanted a divorce. He got a separation!”; “Indecent disposal”; and “Surefire Way to Get a Man’s Attention” were just a few.

And for some time, the narrative of the vengeful wife stuck. The Chicago Tribune ran a massive piece (written by English professor Regina Barreca) assuming that Gallo sliced off her husband’s penis as a form of revenge, glossing over any evidence of abuse. A controversial social critic, Camille Paglia, also questioned the abuse allegations, warning that the “cruel and barbarous” act could spark copycat behavior amongst women similarly seeking a revolutionary thrill.

As the eight-day trial wore on, however, and details of the couple’s clearly ill-fated marriage began to surface, the headlines took a different approach, addressing the then-taboo topic of spousal abuse and the growing divide between how men and women saw the case. The Doylestown Intelligencer ’s 1993 headline, “Latest wedge between sexes is also the sharpest,” seemed to cut right to the chase — with a not-so-subtle pun to boot.

It’s important to note that the Bobbitts’ case happened at a particular time in American history: one year after Amy Fisher, or the Long Island Lolita, shot her lover’s wife, and one year before the murders of Nicole Brown Simpson and her friend, Ron Goldman, thrust O.J. Simpson back into the spotlight. As such, the public was primed to crave sensational journalism — as opposed to serious discussions about domestic abuse — an instinct that has and hasn’t changed over the last two-and-a-half decades.

Today, in the era of the #MeToo movement, Gallo is heralded as a feminist hero, someone who brought domestic abuse into the spotlight and who continues to champion women’s rights. Had she decided to cut Bobbitt in more contemporary times, who’s to know how different the headlines would be?

If you are experiencing domestic violence, please call the National Domestic Violence Hotline at 1-800-799-7233 or TTY 1-800-787-3224 for confidential support.

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February 16, 2019

Daytona 500 ‘Lap 11’ tribute planned for late JD Gibbs, racing exec and son of former NFL coach

A lap in honor of the late NASCAR auto racing executive J.D. Gibbs will be driven during Florida's Daytona 500 on Sunday. 
February 15, 2019

Katy Perry & Orlando Bloom Just Got Engaged — Relax With The Kid Rumors

On-again, off-again couple Katy Perry and Orlando Bloom solidified their "on" status when Bloom popped the question to Perry on Valentine's Day. Now that the world has stopped collectively ooohing and ahhing over the "Swish, Swish" singer's flower power engagement ring, some people want to know when Perry and Bloom will start their family.

A source told People that Perry is pumping the breaks (at least, temporarily) on her career this year, and that the couple "[wants] kids together and will prioritize this."

There's certainly nothing wrong with Bloom and Perry hoping to have kids in the near future, but before we start obsessing over what these two could name their new bundle of joy (which will never be as clever as Perry's name for her cat, Kitty Purry) let's take a breath. The pair just decided to get married, and are probably still a little busy celebrating that big milestone — not immediately jumping into the next one.

Of course, when Bloom and Perry do walk down the aisle, the pop star will become stepmom to Flynn, Bloom's son with his ex-wife, Miranda Kerr.

Bloom loves being a dad, as expressed in a 2017 Instagram post:

"When I was a boy I dreamed of creating a kingdom to share and balance love with life career and everything in between," Bloom wrote in the caption on a photo of him and his son. "[This was] something I didn't fully comprehend till my son opened my heart."

Whenever Bloom and Perry decide to start their family, it'll be awesome. But right now, let's toast to their engagement instead.

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February 15, 2019

Emmy Raver-Lampman Explains That Batshit Umbrella Academy Finale Cliffhanger

Warning: Spoilers ahead forUmbrella Academy season 1 finale, “The White Violin.”

Netflix’s The Umbrella Academy is an unapologetically wild show. Over its 10-episode first season, it throws uber-intelligent, glasses-wearing primates and time-traveling frustrated assassins at us in between raves and vaguely incestuous tension and so much family trauma. However, the season 1 finale, “The White Violin,” is shockingly straightforward. Seventh Hargreeves sibling Vanya (Ellen Page) — formerly believed to be the “ordinary” one — is revealed to be a supervillain in the making. Her power, “the ability to harness energy” when a “certain chord is struck,” as co-star Emmy Raver-Lampman explains to Refinery29, is so great, it is destined to unleash the apocalypse. So Vanya’s six superpowered siblings try to stop her.

Unfortunately, they fail, which makes sense. As many people say over season 1, this apocalypse is inevitable. What wasn’t inevitable is the finale’s “ultimate cliffhanger,” as Raver-Lampman calls it, where Number Five (Aidan Gallagher) uses his time traveling powers to help the entire Umbrella Academy jump to any time but their present one. As the group prepares to leave the current apocalypse behind, the Umbrelladults turn back to their tween selves, as Five did during his premiere episode time jump.

The final seconds of the episode show us the kid Umbrella Academy traveling to the great unknown. We’re left wondering what the hell will happen next if Netflix does order Umbrella Academy season 2. Thankfully, Raver-Lampman is here to tell us, and she sounds excited.

“We all read it and were like, ‘Oh! This is like, if you need a better excuse to go to a season 2, I don’t know what it could possibly be,’” she explains of her television family. “‘Where have they gone? When have they gone?’”

It’s no surprise the Hamilton alum and her TV siblings were asking the same questions fans likely have, as showrunner Steve Blackman kept “White Violin’s” finale surprise from them as well. For nearly three weeks of finale filming, the cast’s script ended with Raver-Lampman’s rumor-powered Allison shooting Vanya. Then, when it came time to film the apocalypse, everything changed. “They gave us the pages and were like, ‘This is where we’re at. We have this crazy idea that we’ll bring the kids back in,” Raver-Lampman recalls of the dumbfounding moment. “We were all like, ‘What are we... How is this gonna…. What’s gonna happen?’”

While the Netflix star doesn’t know exactly what will happen next, she does have some ideas on what the appearance of the Umbrella Academy’s youthful selves actually means. “It’s touching on the fact they’re not going to zap to another location in the current time. They have the ability to then maybe go anywhere in time,” she explains. That last-ditch signal makes sense since, as the final seconds of “White Violin” tick down, blazing chunks of the moon fall to Earth, setting the entire world aflame. It is highly suggested nowhere is safe in that time.

But, the Umbrella Academy members are safe together after a season of trying “to find the place they came from and the time where their lives were better — where their lives were good,” as Raver-Lampman says. The superpowered siblings close the season in the most literal physical embodiment of that era. “They have now found some odd common ground and are like, ‘Yeah, maybe we are better together,’” Allison’s portrayer adds.

Now one question remains: “Are they all going to end up like Five? In the first episode [of season 2], are we going to realize they all jumped forward into the future, and they’re back in their childhood form?,” Raver-Lampman asks. Although the Umbrella Academy writers have kept mum about their plans, showrunner Blackman has assured the Broadway alum she will be back to using her voice if Netflix renews their show. Remember, Allison ends the season with slashed vocal cords (a gruesome Vanya incident in the eighth episode is to blame).

“He’s still apologizing for it,” Raver-Lampman jokes about the Blackman-orchestrated “I Heard A Rumor” catastrophe. “And is like, ‘You know, second season, I promise you’re going to be talking. If we get one.’” So, that means no matter what happens, the Umbrella kids are bound to return to their adult bodies.

We can also hope Vanya returns to her non-supervillain self. As we learn throughout Umbrella Academy season 1, many of the problem around No. 7's extreme powers stem from the fear-based way her father Sir Reginald Hargreeves (Colm Feore) dealt with his children. If he had helped Vanya — rather than lock her in a torture chamber, drug her for a lifetime, and manipulate Allison into rumoring them “away” — no one would be in this end-of-days mess in the first place. Now that the Hargreeves siblings are “all on the same page” for the first time in a decade, as Raver-Lampman says, they might be able to heal the sins of their father.

“It’s a matter of trying to help Vanya find the joy and the understanding of the ability she has,” she continues. “That it isn’t a bad thing — it’s an amazing thing … I think that would be a fun project for [the siblings] to all band together to help their sister who is desperately in need.”

So can the Umbrella Academy save Vanya — in whatever form they happen to be in — with a prospective season 2? “I hope so,” Raver-Lampman sighs. “Because if they don’t have hope I don’t know what we’re doing.”

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February 15, 2019

A brief history of presidential lethargy

A television set turned on in the West Wing of the White House. AP Photo/Susan WalshNo one doubts the job of president of the United States is stressful and demanding. The chief executive deserves downtime. But how much is enough, and when is it too ...
February 15, 2019

A brief history of presidential lethargy

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February 15, 2019

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How white became the color of suffrage

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February 15, 2019

How white became the color of suffrage

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