May 5, 2019

Cryptic pregnancy: ‘I had two seconds to prepare’

Klara only found out she was pregnant when she went into labour. This is the story of that day.
May 5, 2019

Laryngectomy patients learn to sing without a voice box

The choir is made of up of post-op throat cancer patients who have undergone a laryngectomy.
May 5, 2019

Shareholders ‘not stopping excessive executive pay’

Rules that let shareholders veto excessive executive pay have failed, new research suggests.
May 5, 2019

Newspaper headlines: Is cross-party Brexit deal ‘99% done’?

The papers focus on talks between Labour and the Conservatives as they try to agree a Brexit deal.
May 5, 2019

Triple rape suspect ‘abducts two other women’

Joseph McCann, wanted for three rapes, is believed to be connected to the abduction of two other women.
May 5, 2019

The US military really doesn’t want to talk about UFOs anymore

The relationship between the U.S. government and UFO researchers has always been a strange one. Releases of information on UFO observations by the government have always been scarce, leading to accusations of conspiracy and cover-ups. It doesn't appear that's going to change any time soon. In 2018 a report surfaced describing the study of alleged otherworldly materials by at least one company under contract with the U.S., along with video of a days-long confrontation between unidentified aircraft capable of physics-defying maneuvers and U.S. Navy pilots. Now, The Washington Post reports that the Navy is taking new measures to secure information related to such sightings and, put simply, will continue to prevent the general public from learning about them. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3RlbqOl_4NA One day prior to the Navy's new info lock-down, Washington Post relayed word from a military official who claimed that UFOs have been observed near military bases on a regular basis for years, sometimes as often as several times every month. Politico, which reached out to the Navy following the previous reporting, received the following official statement:
There have been a number of reports of unauthorized and/or unidentified aircraft entering various military-controlled ranges and designated air space in recent years. For safety and security concerns, the Navy and the [U.S. Air Force] takes these reports very seriously and investigates each and every report. As part of this effort the Navy is updating and formalizing the process by which reports of any such suspected incursions can be made to the cognizant authorities. A new message to the fleet that will detail the steps for reporting is in draft.
The reports of unidentified aircraft include some seriously wild details, such as objects seemingly able to travel at incredible speeds and at angles that shouldn't be possible by conventional aircraft. Obviously the first thing that comes to everyone's mind when they hear of UFOs is "aliens." That may well be a plausible explanation for these sightings, but that doesn't necessarily mean much to military officials who would be just as concerned over the spread of data if the objects turned out to be products of a foreign government or other entity. Whatever they are, and wherever they come from, the U.S. government seems comfortable keeping its findings to itself.
May 5, 2019

Pelosi said Trump might not leave office if he loses in 2020. He once said himself he might not.

In a New York Times feature interview this weekend, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) warned that it’s likely President Donald Trump will contest the results of the next election in an attempt to stay in power, especially if he loses by a thin margin. While this may sound like an extreme concern, it’s substantiated by […]
May 5, 2019

Leytonstone crash: Murder probe after man, 52, dies

A 52-year-old man was killed after being hit by a car in Leytonstone, east London.
May 5, 2019

Trump raises tariffs, claiming China pays the costs. Actually, U.S. consumers do.

President Donald Trump announced on Sunday that he was dramatically increasing tariffs on Chinese goods this Friday, increasing them from ten to 25% in an effort to hustle along a long-sought trade deal between the two countries. In announcing the change, the president seemed to misunderstand how tariffs actually work. “The Tariffs paid to the […]
May 5, 2019

FCC demands to know if wireless carriers stopped selling location data like they promised

The FCC is demanding answers from several carriers over a bombshell Motherboard report from earlier this year that revealed how the carriers made a habit of selling location data about their subscribers to third-parties. That revelation about the practice wasn't new, but the eye-opening part was how those third parties can then make the subscriber data available to anyone from bounty hunters to private investigators, credit companies and more. This sketchy practice meant that when a data aggregator company like Zumigo obtained location information about a carrier's customer, they often passed that data on to other sources -- meaning, the data frequently got into the hands of people and companies that shouldn't have it. The four big carriers quickly promised to give up the practice once this came to light. But the FCC doesn't want to take them at their word, as the commission's letters it sent in recent days to AT&T, Sprint, Verizon and T-Mobile make clear. The letters ask, among other things, for clarification around when this practice was actually abandoned while acknowledging that the carriers have already publicly promised that it would be. "Real-time location information is sensitive data deserving the highest level of privacy protection," FCC commissioner Jessica Rosenworcel writes in one of the letters, to AT&T CEO John Donovan. "But it is evident from press reports that this data may have been sold without the explicit consent of consumers and without appropriate safeguards in place." With that in mind, she goes on to thank AT&T's top executive for the company's promise to end this practice by March. But she asks for an update, regardless, as well as a specific date for when this was ended. Among other things, she also asks to be informed whether AT&T's agreements allowed aggregators "or others" to save and store location data received from the carrier. The other big carriers got basically the same letter, which asks that all of the requested answers be submitted by May 15. It's certainly good to see the commission bring this level of scrutiny to a practice that was pretty shocking to read about, especially with the Motherboard piece noting that the practice flew in the face of things like T-Mobile CEO John Legere promising last year that his company “will not sell customer location data to shady middlemen.” No wonder the commission is dubious.