March 3, 2019

Elon Musk just announced that Tesla will reveal its Model Y SUV on March 14 in Los Angeles (TSLA)

Elon Musk tweeted Sunday that Tesla would reveal its Model Y crossover SUV on March 14. The unveiling is planned for Tesla's design studio in Los Angeles, Musk said. Musk also said that the Tesla Model Y would cost about 10%...
March 3, 2019

Man arrested for egging Jeremy Corbyn in Finsbury Park

The Labour leader was visiting a mosque in north London when the egg was thrown at him on Sunday.
March 3, 2019

Malaysian Prime Minister tells MH370 family member ‘we intend to continue’ search

Malaysian Prime Minister Mahathir Mohamad has promised to continue the search for missing Malaysia Airlines Flight 370, almost five years to the day since it disappeared.
March 3, 2019

ODPC says it was ‘categorically’ not lobbied by Kenny – RTE.ie

ODPC says it was 'categorically' not lobbied by Kenny  RTE.ie'Friend of Facebook' Enda Kenny offered to lobby on company's behalf while Taoiseach, says Observer article  TheJournal.ieEnda Kenny offered to help Facebook influence oth...
March 3, 2019

Run-down towns to get £1.6bn post-Brexit boost

Prosperity has been unfairly spread, says the PM, as Labour accuses her of trying to influence its MPs.
March 3, 2019

Hamilton leads with five wins at What’s On Stage Awards

Little Shop of Horrors and Heathers The Musical also won big at the London ceremony.
March 3, 2019

Jeremy Corbyn egged outside mosque

UK Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn is unharmed after he was pelted with an egg during a visit to a North London mosque Sunday, a Labour Party source confirmed to CNN.
March 3, 2019

Ian Ogle: Man arrested at airport over Belfast murder

The 32-year-old was arrested at Manchester Airport on Sunday night.
March 3, 2019

Trump ordered to pay legal fees after losing court battle over his Scottish golf course

President Donald Trump will have to pay the Scottish government’s legal fees after a lengthy court dispute over a wind power development project near his golf resort that ended in a victory for Scotland in 2015. Judges in Scotland ruled last week that the Trump International Golf Club Scotland Ltd must pay the legal costs […]
March 3, 2019

Scientists gave mice infrared vision, but could they do the same for humans?

Mice are already masters of lurking in the shadows, well out of sight of prying human eyes, but researchers in the U.S. and China just turned a few of them into serious superheroes. The mice, which are normally equipped with eyes capable only of seeing visible light, like us humans, have instead been given the ability to see near infrared light, effectively allowing them to see in the dark. By injecting specially designed nanoparticles directly into the eyes of the mice, the animals exhibited the ability to see near infrared light. Even more remarkable, the vision augmentation doesn't appear to have negatively affected the daylight vision of the mice. The research, which was published in a new paper in the journal Cell, focused on formulating special nanoparticles that convert near infrared light into a greenish visible light. The particles adhere to the photoreceptors in the animals' eyes, and when infrared light hits them it produces a signal that is sent to the animal's brain in the same way as visible light. "When light enters the eye and hits the retina, the rods and cones— or photoreceptor cells — absorb the photons with visible light wavelengths and send corresponding electric signals to the brain," co-author Gang Han of the University of Massachusetts Medical School explains. "Because infrared wavelengths are too long to be absorbed by photoreceptors, we are not able to perceive them." The injection given to the mice is a workaround for that shortcoming, promoting compatibility between visible light photoreceptors and infrared light. To test how well the nanoparticles worked, the researchers carried out a number of experiments to determine if the eyes of the mice were picking up infrared light. One particular experiment involved two connected boxes, one of which was completely dark while the other was bathed in infrared light. Mice prefer the dark, and the non-injected mice showed no preference between the totally dark compartment and the one with infrared light since they simply can't see it. The modified mice, however, didn't like the infrared light compartment, suggesting they were indeed seeing the infrared light. The team suggests that something similar might even work well in humans. The nanoparticles remain in the eyes for up to two months without any obvious negative effects, and while they're not ready to go poking needles in human eyes just yet, the day might not be far off.